Paris By Numbers.

I suppose you could call this my New Year's Resolution...

304,176 notes


Secret cinema found beneath Paris
In September 2004, French police discovered a hidden chamber in the catacombs under Paris. It contained a full-sized movie screen, projection equipment, a bar, a pressure cooker for making couscous, a professionally installed electricity system, and at least three phone lines. Movies ranged from 1950s noir classics to recent thrillers.
When the police returned three days later, the phone and power lines had been cut and there was a note on the floor: “Do not try to find us.” (via)

Secret cinema found beneath Paris

In September 2004, French police discovered a hidden chamber in the catacombs under Paris. It contained a full-sized movie screen, projection equipment, a bar, a pressure cooker for making couscous, a professionally installed electricity system, and at least three phone lines. Movies ranged from 1950s noir classics to recent thrillers.

When the police returned three days later, the phone and power lines had been cut and there was a note on the floor: “Do not try to find us.” (via)

(via oilauren)

1,323 notes

The Opera Garnier, 9th arrondissement.
Although it used to house the Opera de Paris, that company has now moved to the Opera Bastille, and the Opera Garnier is mostly used for the ballet these days. If you get the opportunity, take an unguided tour. It costs less than 10€ - you’ll probably have to queue for a while to get in, but it’s worth the wait - you can stay for as long as you like, with access to the auditorium, the staircase, and the hallways. It was completed in 1875, and is simply exquisite, like a palace, which, in some ways, I suppose it is.

The Opera Garnier, 9th arrondissement.

Although it used to house the Opera de Paris, that company has now moved to the Opera Bastille, and the Opera Garnier is mostly used for the ballet these days. If you get the opportunity, take an unguided tour. It costs less than 10€ - you’ll probably have to queue for a while to get in, but it’s worth the wait - you can stay for as long as you like, with access to the auditorium, the staircase, and the hallways. It was completed in 1875, and is simply exquisite, like a palace, which, in some ways, I suppose it is.

(Source: nickdrake, via itsdelovely)

Filed under Opera Opera Garnier Paris 9th arr 9th arrondissement unguided tour

2 notes

Marks & Spencer returns to Paris.

Many of you will already know this, many more will not care, but there will be some people who simply have no idea. Marks & Spencer left Paris, along with the rest of Europe, a decade ago, due to a low success rate in Europe. France, however, and especially Paris, had welcomed M&S with open arms, and lamented its departure.

This month, they will lament no more, for M&S is returning to French shores, with a flagship store at 100 Champs Elysées. Finally, we won’t have to return to England to get “bacon, sausages, double cream, Earl Grey tea and cotton knickers”, as The Guardian put it, as well as (I hope) ready meals, cheddar, tights, and shoes that I know will fit.

The store will open in November, they say. It’s now November, the French website is now live, at http://www.marksandspencer.fr/, and excitement is building, especially within the British expat community to which I belong. I am not exaggerating when I say that we - and many like us - are planning a trip as soon as possible, to stock up on such delights.

Maybe I’ll see some of you there…

(Source: parisbynumbers)

Filed under Paris France Marks & Spencer Marks and Spencer department store bacon sausages double cream Earl Grey tea cotton knickers knickers pants ready meals cheddar tights shoes British expat Europe November paris by numbers parisbynumbers

10 notes

diedandturnedintoaroman:

There’s something about Paris in the morning. This was taken while running across Port des Arts to get to the Musee d’Orsay. The Pont des Arts is my favourite bridge in Paris. At night time, big groups of young people come out with picnic blankets and bottles of wine and and play music and talk. Walking acorss that bridge and being a part of that made me glad to be alive - a true joie de vivre moment.

The Pont des Arts, which is famous for the tradition of going with your partner to lock a padlock onto it, and throwing the key into the river to symbolise your everlasting love, as well as the marvellous views.

diedandturnedintoaroman:

There’s something about Paris in the morning. This was taken while running across Port des Arts to get to the Musee d’Orsay. The Pont des Arts is my favourite bridge in Paris. At night time, big groups of young people come out with picnic blankets and bottles of wine and and play music and talk. Walking acorss that bridge and being a part of that made me glad to be alive - a true joie de vivre moment.

The Pont des Arts, which is famous for the tradition of going with your partner to lock a padlock onto it, and throwing the key into the river to symbolise your everlasting love, as well as the marvellous views.

(Source: diedandturnedintobarrowman)

Filed under Pont des Arts Paris